I think this is something that happens to a number of people who do a similar job to me – i.e. you send your working years developing specifications, talking to customers, looking at internal processes for support, change requests, reporting, little bit of this, little bit of that. And whenever a new person starts in the team they go around the introductions: “I’m Dave, developer”, “I’m Jane, developer”, “I’m Gary, trainer”, then the inevitable “I’m Tim, er…[mumble][cough]..er…stuff…well I’m doing something all day, you know…”

So it came as a great relief when it turns out that what I do is IT Business Analysis. Seems this is something that happens to many BAs who find they’ve effectively been one for a long time but didn’t have a title for it. What’s interesting is that when you have a label for it it becomes easier to understand what you do, what it links into the other things you do; it tidies things up and gives you access to other people who have been aware of BA for a long time (LinkedIn groups is great for this). I got the book (Business Analysis, 2nd Ed, BCS) and sure enough, these indeed covered a much of my job description (though the book nicely formalises it and has much more that I have to learn from – and I should do the exam too).

Of course there’s a heck of a lot more to being a BA, and the thing you really need to grips with (and that’s next on the reading list, or at least get familiar with list) is BABOK 2 (Business Analysis Body Of Knowledge version 2).

Anyway, so finally I have crystallised my job title to “Business Analyst / Communication Consultant” – I dropped “IT” at the beginning for brevity, but added Communications Consultant at the end for levity [are you sure that’s the right word? Ed] to cover all the comms work I’m doing, particularly with social media development (Twitter chats, Google+, YouTube channel, help desk self service). It’s quite refreshing when you can find you can tell people what you do with surety and conviction.